Spent 4 days sailing and camping around Lake Tahoe in my canoe. This video covers day two, with a lot of headwind rowing and a fantastic spots to sleep in the canoe. Check out all the canoe videos at http://www.youtube.com/jordansname

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lake tahoe canoe sailing, rowing and camping, youtube adventure video documentary, jordansname

I’m sitting at a Flaming Gorge launch ramp waiting for the 50 mile gust to subside so I can launch the canoe.  Hopefully I’ll get to float the damned up Green River for around 5 days, my longest float yet.  Currently I’m enjoying some sun from behind the windshield trying to motivate myself  to write about Redfish Lake.   My time there was incredible.  For four straight days we lived in the canoe amongst giant jagged peaks while the Eagles hunted Sockeye Salmon in the headwaters of the prettiest lake you can drive to, maybe the prettiest I’ve ever seen.  More than likely I would of felt different about the lake if I was there in the middle of summer, with water skiers and boy scouts being the only sites around.  But, I arrived on the Lodges closing day.  The guys tearing down the docks for winter helped launch the canoe.  This time I ate brunch at the Lodge before getting on the water.  I overheard the girls serving the buffet talking about last nights low, 10 degrees.  As I launched, Art drove up in his van and asked what I was doing.  He kept asking if I had a buddy, I think maybe he was seeing Nora, but he was concerned for my safety.  Thankfully he offered to be my arrival party four days later.  Atleast one person knew what I was up to, and was waiting for me to get back.  The only reason I came back was because I ran out of food, or maybe it was the 15 degrees mornings.  Although, sleeping in the van around the lake felt a lot colder than sleeping in the canoe on the water.  Probably the lakes higher temp making the nights bearable.  On my last night I caught a giant trout with some line tied to a floating stick.  Way better than fishing with a pole. My pole is lying about 15 feet of water after the damned thing went overboard.  I ate the trout.  Before catching this delicious and overdue dinner I caught an even bigger bull trout.  Both fish were longer than the stick I caught them on.  Shoving off in the canoe to chase a floating stick as it runs off across the lake is fantastic stuff.  Pulling them up by hand is way better than a reel.  The eagles would fly to my floating camp in the mornings.  Early one day I saw a juvenile eagle take off after an adult, young chasing old in one grand path around the lake.  My first night out I tied off to some federal docks that claimed “No Overnight Mooring”.  The docks froze over that night and some kids came the next morning. They threw rocks for Nora then helped their leader pull up the docks.  Each morning we’d wake up with the top layer of the canoe frozen over.  Day two, or so, I rowed out early to photograph the sunrise on the mountains.  I set my canoe paddle down, took a few shots, then noticed the drip on my paddles end had frozen within minutes.  On the last night, after chasing giant trout, I decided not to reset the anchor.  We spent an entire night adrift in the middle of the lake, I actually slept.  The next morning I rowed back around the point to where the mountains started to fade and the van started to appear.  Art was waiting for me at the lodge.  He and a friend where putting antifreeze in the pipes. There’s was a couple from Tennessee claiming the only occupied campsite on the lake.  We chatted about paddling the Inside Passage to Alaska.  Art and friend threw the canoe on top of the van, we all smiled and talked of my late season canoe trip.  I’m guessing Redfish Lake will be the highlight of this trip.

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

 

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

redfish lake sawtooth mountains idaho

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nora and I put in for 4 days and 3 nights of canoe camping on Lake McDonald.  Being in a National Park made things tricky.  I had to get a 3 day backcountry permit saying I would stay in a very specific campsite up off the lakeshore.  I did my best to explain that I would be staying in the canoe, completely, for all four days.  Guaranteed they had never heard of a guy requesting to be on the lake, in a canoe, for that long of a period.  The national park guys were kind, and we basically agreed I’d be floating somewhere close to the campsite, which I didn’t.  Also, they let me watch this awesome video on avoiding being killed by a bear.  Evidently your not suppose to stare into the eyes of a bear.  I asked the park guy why, he explained “you’ll turn to stone”.  I headed for the launch ramp and a few nice fellows taking their ladies on a power boat cruise put my canoe in the lake.  I carried all my stuff down to the docks, climbed in the canoe, then a sweet old man offered to take my wheelchair up to the van.  I shoved off the docks, rowed for a bit, then caught a nice breeze.  It had taken me all day to be afloat, immediately I began looking for a place to anchor.   Fortunately I found the the top of a drowned tree offering a place to tie up.  It was the beginning of October in the Montana Mountains and I was grateful to be sleeping on the soon to be sunny side of the lake, that would come after the full moon night in the thirties.  I never sleep the first night out.  Although, I did have this awesome dream of the bear from the pamphlet barreling down the mountainside before submerging my canoe and roasting me over an open campfire.  But come morning, there had been no bear and no campfire.  Just freezing cold weather and a canoe tangling itself up with a log.  Day two on the lake was good.  We rowed along the north shore that had accidentally been burned by firefighters trying to stop a campsite fire.  Poor forest. Could you imagine being a hundred year old, fifty foot tall tree, and the little noisy fleshy things that live below you decide they are going to protect you from harm.  Anyways,  we awoke and rowed along this mysteriously beautiful burnt down shoreline.  I was complaining to myself about the lack of wind when instantly the lake went from dead calm to blowing.  It blew at least thirty, or I was in a tiny boat and it blew about twenty.  Either way it was strong.   Surprise to me was how well the boat handled the conditions.  At the end of the blow the biggest wind waves were three feet tall and yet the boat was dry.  I sailed across wind and wave.  The canoe ama would take the wave first, allowing for a nice comfortable roll over the wave tops.  Sailing downwind was awesome, the boat flew and even had moments of surf.  The wind became scary strong, and I found a nice little cove with a few empty moorings, abandoned for the winter.  Evidently mountain lake people have different customs than coastline dwellers.  Before taking one of the balls for some necessary protection I decided to ask a kind looking lady on the shoreline, just to be polite.  As a shock to me, she said NO. This lit me up and off I took screaming across the lake, tiny canoe in a mountain sized gale.  I now appreciate her forcing me to go out in those conditions.  I gained a ton of confidence in the boat and really had a blast jumping across the waves from one side of the lake to the other.  Just before reaching the other side of the lake a power boat came skipping down on me.  It’s never fun to see a boat approaching so fast, especially not when your hanging on to the oars/tiller for life.   Some guy was driving the boat and was kind enough to pull up on my leeward side so some lady could pop up and yell at me.  It was the lady that had denied me mooring, she wanted to make sure I was surviving the blow.  There was plenty I wanted to say at the moment, but instead I looked at her with bewilderment and continued on my way.   Ended up finding a good spot to drop hook for the night, where the rich folks in the giant cabins over the beach didn’t  care about me and the dog sleeping in a little metal canoe on their lake.  I fell asleep early and woke up even earlier.  There was a full moon rising, probably about midnight.  I decided to tear down the tarps, sleeping bags and start rowing back towards the van.  I had 11 miles to go and figured the flat calm of night would be good for rowing.  I pulled up to the shoreline for Nora’s shore leave, and could smell the lakeside resort preparing bacon and eggs for Sunday morning brunch, I would later eat some oatmeal.   Having an entire lake all to myself during a full moon night will forever impress me.  I rowed and rowed while the moon crossed over from one oar to the other, setting just before the rising sun.  By the time the sun had risen I had sight of the buildings around where I launched and decided to jump back over to the sunny side of the lake to tie up for one more night.  My best nights sleep come with a stern line tied to shore.  I didn’t catch any fish, but did a sunset, moonrise and then sunrise.  This was my last night on the lake.  Next morning I calmly rowed back to the launch ramp with absolutely no concerns about how I would get the canoe back on top of the van or anything else for that matter.  Experience out on the water makes life on land seem comfortable.

 

Spent the first week in South Lake Tahoe camping with the family, plenty of bike rides, paddling, and coffee stops…Image

Decommissioned beast, purchased surplus by lake tahoe contractor, it’s for sale if you need one….Image

Was good to have the first week paddling around with the family, gave me a safe opportunity to test the new canoe and all it’s additions and make a few modifications, here’s looking at Emerald Cove during a family paddle..

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Sad goodbye to the fam and set off on my own for 4 days in a canoe on lake tahoe…Image

View from my first nights anchorage, view was incredible, didn’t sleep at all, later I would learn to find a log on on land for a stern line, i spent the entire night taking 1 foot rollers directly on the beam, makes sleeping in a canoe tough….

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View from second nights anchorage….

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None of my neighbors stuck it out for the night…

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Nora happy to have some shade…

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Looking towards shore at second nights anchorage..

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Tourist headed into Emerald Cove..

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Made it into Emerald Cove for my third and final night, getting in was tough, strong wind blowing straight out of the mile deep cove, basically learned to flip the sail backwards and row/sail back and forth up into the cove, was weird struggling for hours on end to get my little boat beating into the wind while families on giant pleasure boats powered by with kids skiiing across their wakes….
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Sunrise on my second morning out…

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You can see my stern line in this shot, took a while to get the loop in the rope around the log on shore while sitting in the canoe using the paddle end, somebody came by while I was sitting in the canoe in the water rocking against the shoreline reaching out trying to hook a log with rope on the end of my paddle, he offered to put the rope on the log for me while staring at me strangely from just a few feet away, i told him “no thanks, i have to do this myself”, he gave me an even stranger look, i didn’t feel like explaining that I was stuck in the canoe and if i couldn’t get the rope on the log by myself that night I probably wouldn’t be able to get it off in the morning,  I think Nora saved me from a curious bear this night,  a few hours before sunrise I awoke to her growling at something on shore, short time later I heard large logs being cracked open up in the woods, my guess is a hungry bear was hoping to eat the goodies in my canoe….
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I was working on setting up my stern line for the third night, nora stood on a submerged rock in about 5 feet of water wondering when I would be ready to throw something for her…

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Leaving Emerald Cove early in the morning for our first ever calm water paddle, recorded myself at about 3.5 knots rowing….Image

Checking out my shadow in probably about 40 feet of water….

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Making coffee with lake tahoe water, the giant lake stayed super calm all morning, it was awesome…Image

Here’s Emerald Cove from the road on my way out, if you look straight to the left of the island you can see the little peninsula  anchored behind on my last night….Image

I’m on the road.  Left a few weeks ago, and should finish sometime in Nov.  I plan to take video and pictures. Posting the pictures while on the road and saving the video for when I’m done.  Be sure to check the site over the next few months for updates like this one.

Beginning of my trip involved taking a friend up to Idaho.  Pretty much just a lot of driving.  Getting out of California was unbearably hot, Donner Pass was a welcome relief, Reno was a lot cleaner than I remember, penny slots are good for free beer, and buffets aren’t as much fun as I remember.  Eventually we made it to Idaho.  Here’s a few shots.

Plenty of brush fires had just rolled through Nevada, leaving black dust to turn in the dirt devils…Image

The last of the barren Nevada landscape before the green rich valley surrounding Boise, ID….

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Now on my way back to california, trying to find a dirt road up into one of these hills for a nights sleep…Image

Spotted some antelope running through farm land while I bounced up a dirt road towards the mountains, things are always super skittish around this time of year, no fun getting shot at every Fall..

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After hitting one too many rocks with the undercarriage I decided to make this spot camp..

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Thunderstorm rolled through to the north.  Watched the whole thing and didn’t feel a drop of rain.  The wind was insane.  I was more worried about the canoe on top of the car while I was sitting here then when I was on the highway…

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The mountains I was trying to get up into before the rocks had a go at my van…

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Your right, sunset…

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Little reminder to always be safe on the road, you can see his trailer in the background….

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Speaking of being safe, I should clean my windshield….

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Will be updating again in a few days.  Canoe will be in the water.  Thanks!

 

Sailboat and her Ball

sunset

Headed home to Oregon for a week of much needed R&R.   It’s going to be cold.  Lately I’ve been missing my time on the road, when I could change my weather in a days drive.  For now I’m stuck in Morro Bay.  Fortunately, it’s a good place for me.  The surrounding landscapes, influenced by California’s crazy coastal weather, is a photograph in need of capture.  The boat is parked on a mooring ball about 50 yards from the dunes, or a few hundred depending on the tides.  The easy skiff ride to the sand has Nora asking if we can stay forever.  Morro Bay is a boat friendly harbor.  The people here make being new and broken down in town a comfortable and easy experience.  Everyone I’ve met here as offered assistance in getting Selene back in shape, it’s a true boating community.  It’s been an up and down battle over the past few weeks, trying to figure out how I barely covered 100 nautical miles before being down for major repairs.  Wondering if I’m capable of sailing as far as I want.  Debating wether the struggle of keeping a sailboat sailing is really worth the joy.  Realizing it’s not even joy I get from sailing, but some sick satisfaction.  Getting ready to sell the boat, build a camper trailer and hit the road again.  Then when I hit that point of giving up, it comes to me that as soon as I give up the boat I’ll start dreaming of another.  Please don’t tell Selene I had these thoughts, she’s far too good a boat to have such a doubtful sailor onboard.  Thankfully she’s such an elegantly tough little boat and I’ve come full circle.  I found a mast last week and I’m in the process of moving it to the harbor hard.  Hoping to be stepping a Catalina 27 STD Rig this coming spring.  It’s a 33′ stick, shorter and stouter than the one I left on the bottom of the pacific.  All in all it’s turning out to be a God send.  Thanks to everyone for the support, especially Morro Bay!

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